OSLO, AUGUST 31ST

MATERIALS

DOCUMENTATION

PHOTOS

VIDEOS

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JOACHIM TRIER

2011 || Norway || 96 mins || Color || in Norwegian || Feature

WORLD SALES

THE MATCH FACTORY

FESTIVALS / AWARDS

CANNES 2011 - A CERTAIN REGARD
SUNDANCE 2012
NEW DIRECTORS / NEW FILMS 2012

SYNOPSIS

Anders will soon complete his drug rehabilitation in the countryside. As part of the program, he is allowed to go into the city for a job interview. But he takes advantage of the leave and stays on in the city, walking around, meeting people he hasn't seen in a long while. Thirty-four-year-old Anders is smart, handsome and from a good family, but deeply haunted by all the opportunities he has wasted, all the people he has let down. He is still relatively young, but feels his life in many ways already is over. For the remainder of the day and long into the night, the ghosts of past mistakes will wrestle with the chance of love, of a new life, with the hope to see some future by morning... From the director of the award-winning REPRISE.

CAST

Anders DANIELSEN LIE

PRESS QUOTES

Confident and beautifully crafted second film adds a contempo finish and pays homage to the French New Wave, adapting the suicide-themed novel that also inspired Louis Malle's "The Fire Within" ... feels like a younger "A Single Man" (the film, not the novel), with the catalyst of grief replaced by a combination of withdrawal symptoms and a more serious-minded quest to understand whether life is worth living.

As in most New Wave films, there's a deceptive lightness to what happens during Anders' day and how that action is presented, shot through with moments of melancholy; result makes for absolutely compelling viewing. A blink-and-you'll-miss-it jump cut in a scene when Anders says goodbye to a wary Thomas further underlines how well the film has established itself as a 21st-century Norwegian equivalent of a New Wave feature.

— Boyd Von Hoeij, VARIETY

Oslo, August 31st sounds like it could be inordinately depressing but Trier achieves the difficult task of making Anders seem brutally honest rather than self-pitying.... Anders Danielsen Lie makes Anders a believable figure. There is little of the stereotypical addict about the character or the performance. There is no obvious edginess or actorly gestures but instead a sense of quiet inner anguish and growing resolution... Anders’ journey through the sights and sounds of the city almost feels like someone bidding farewell to a place that has meant the world to them. Cinematographer Jakob Inhre does nothing to glamourise the city but captures that end of summer feeling as light fades and a first chill is felt. It is an important visual statement that matches Anders sense of regret and uncertainty about what the future may bring.

— Allan Hunter, SCREEN INTERNATIONAL